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Aurora case study: Catherine Lynch

04 Mar 2019 | University College Dublin

Aurora gave me the space to reflect on my own leadership experiences and possibilities, at a time of transition. Effective leaders lead, lean-in and learn. So this Aurora journey, it does not have an end. The Aurora effect is visible in my heightened expectations; expectations of men in leadership, of myself and for myself. There can be higher expectations on female leaders to support women. So I’ve raised my expectations of men. My role requires leadership and authentic voice, so I put myself forward. I value my work and myself; if I do not, I perpetuate the idea that women will work harder for less, especially if it is for work they believe in.

I have called on those who supported Aurora to continue their support for me back at home. Their responses have had a profound effect on our relationships. Through them, I have the encouragement, critique and role-modelling I need. I have been appointed to chairing and committee membership roles. 

There is a time to change your attitude to a situation and there is a time to change the situation. I believe the time for sectoral change is now. Those supporting Aurora and Aurorans can embrace this responsibility and realise great purpose. I believe I have a leadership role to play and I am ready.

The Aurora effect is visible in my heightened expectations; expectations of men in leadership, of myself and for myself."

Catherine Lynch
Gender Project Manager
University College Dublin

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